The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti

The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti

Hawthorne Creely always admired Lizzie Lovett's life. She was in awe of how radiant she was and how easily she seemed to find life. So when Lizzie disappears, Hawthorne becomes obsessed with the mystery of it all. She wants to know more about the mysterious girl who went missing and solve the puzzle to prove to herself magic really goes exist, she takes Lizzie's old job, starts hanging out with Lizzie's boyfriend and begins a strange adventure to discover who Lizzie really was. 

This book was enjoyable to read, I was intrigued by what would happen and most importantly, what happened to Lizzie. I was also creeped out by Hawthorne's character. On one hand, I could identify with her so closely it was as if she was written about me - an enigmatic girl who thought differently than everyone else, who nobody really liked. On the other hand, I found it really creepy how obsessed Hawthorne was with Lizzie, a girl she didn't even really know. The moments that creeped me out the most weren't when she was wondering about Lizzie and trying to put the pieces together in her own head, it was when she openly asked personal questions about Lizzie, even when she knew she was crossing a line. I couldn't get over the weirdness of that part of Hawthorne's character, so it took away quite a bit of the enjoyment of this book for me. 

The ending wasn't that surprising, although I was torn between whether or not it would be an ending like this, or a supernatural ending as we were sort-of led to invest in throughout the book, which was something that kept me hooked as I wanted to know the outcome. I would possibly recommend reading this book, for the uniqueness that is Hawthorne Creely and the imagery that this book gave me, but it isn't a must-read. 

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